Saturday, April 7, 2012

Chandra Devi Goja Musk and Jasmine Tibetan Incense

Chandra Devi Goja Tibetan Incense Goja is the name for an Indian delicacy made for dessert. It is a recipe that consists of fried wheat crackers dipped in sugar syrup. Naming an incense recipe after a food recipe is a confirmation of a theory advanced by a famous delver into the human senses, the infamous but reclusive researcher Dr. Layton.
He theorizes that incense that is strongly associated with a country reflects the qualities of that country's cuisine - echoing the connection between the sense of smell and the sense of taste. For example, Japanese incense is very subtle, expressive, and simple - like their traditional foods of rice, fish, and soy products. Indian incense reflects the personality of that sub-continents' cuisine - spicy, sometimes sweet and hot, heavy and flavorful. Now we have the example of Tibetan incense - but is there a dish or recipe associated with Tibet? Very few if any come to mind. So, Tibetan incense, like white rice and wheat noodles, is elusive, ascetic, dry, simple as a fire made using grass and herbs and fragrant woods. That perfectly describes this incense.

The Goja recipe is comprised of musk and jasmine, along with the amazing herbal mixture that gives this brand its unique qualities. The dry stick is almost odorless under the nose - the epitome of subtlety. Lighting the stick, one starts getting a sense of the qualities of this fragrance. Slight and sugary, delightful hints of jasmine and musk are accompanied by a strong herbal base that contrasts with the sweetness. It is a compelling scent, one that warrants continued attention and gives a sacred space a sense of being outdoors, a part of the universe as a whole. It rewards meditation, as well as being a suitable background for daily activities. Like a dessert, it blends with and complements all kinds of everyday living.

40 sticks, 17 cm. Hand made in Nepal